Style Guide: Spring 2013

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Projects worth doing

Life’s always a little easier when it comes with instructions. Here are step-by-step instructions for creating some of the great looks throughout this edition. Bonus? Download a PDF so that you can print out the instructions for your next visit to the store.

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How-To

Flower Tower

Make an instant statement in your garden with this colorful Flower Tower.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
1-2 hours
Cost:
$90-$100, not including flowers
  • Tools & Materials

    • 4-foot galvanized wire fencing with 2-inch x 4-inch openings
    • Landscape fabric
    • Aviation snips or tin snips
    • 6-inch black zip ties
    • Garden spade
    • Scissors
    • 13 ½-inch flower pot
    • Leather palm or cut-resistant work gloves
    • Utility knife
    • 60 flowers
    • Potting soil
  • Step 1

    Create a cylinder with the wire fencing. You’ll place this inside your flower pot. You can use the outside of a slightly smaller container as a guide to help make the cylinder round as you create it.

    Allow an overlap of one fencing section to make the seam stable. Cut the fencing to the desired diameter using the aviation snips. Wear gloves when handling the fence to avoid injury from the sharp edges. You may also want to have a helper at this step to help control the wire fencing as you make the cuts.

  • Step 2

    Overlap one rectangle of the wire fencing and snuggly ziptie the two sides of the cylinder together. Continue tying the rest of the tower together across the joints in the fence. Use enough ties to keep the wire rigid and stable once it is filled.

    Cut the excessive long ends of the zip ties to leave about ¼ inch.

    With your wire tower frame built, check to make sure it fits into the selected container. The tower should fit about a half to three-quarters of the way into the container to increase stability once filled. If you need to cut down the height, simply use the snips.

    The tower should be no more than 1.5 times the height of the pot when completed. For example, the tower for an 18-inchhigh pot should be no higher than 45 inches. This is to ensure the tower isn’t impacted by wind or anything hitting it, causing it to fall over.

  • Step 3

    Wrap the landscape fabric around the outside of the tower to measure how much you will need.

    Cut the fabric to size using a pair of scissors. Let the fabric overlap an inch or two so soil cannot spill out through the seam.

    Then roll the fabric and slide it inside the tower. Smooth the fabric along the inside of the tower. Cut the excess fabric from the top of the tower, leaving 2 inches of fabric extending beyond the top of the tower. This will help secure the fabric to the tower.

  • Step 4

    Fold the 2-inch flap of fabric over the top of the tower, and use your utility knife to cut small slits in the fabric just under the metal rim. Cut through both layers of the fabric. Cut one slit in every third rectangle of the fencing, and then insert zip ties through the slits you just cut, and tie down the top of the fabric.

    Cut the long ends to a ¼ inch, just like you did the previous zip ties.

  • Step 5

    Fill the tower up about one-third with soil, and then add water to settle the soil. Fill to two-thirds full with soil, and add more water. Fill to about 1 inch from the top of the tower with soil and add water.

    Lightly press the soil into the tower once it is full to prevent sinking of the soil.

  • Step 6

    Use your garden spade to fill soil around the outside of the tower inside the container.

  • Step 7

    Cut a vertical slit and a horizontal slit into one of the toplevel rectangles in the tower. You will end up with a “+” shaped hole cut in the side of the tower. These holes are where you will plant the flowers.

    Cut one hole in every other rectangle and stagger them as you work your way down the tower. Leave the bottom row just above the soil line free of holes. This will allow the plants to cascade over the edge of the container.

  • Step 8

    Now it’s time to add your flowers. Use your finger to create a void behind the opening to press the plant into. Gently press the plant or seedling into the opening. It should fit snugly, but you shouldn’t have to force it. Once the plant is inserted in the tower, make sure the flaps of fabric close around the stem of the flower. This will help hold soil in the tower when watering it.

  • Step 9

    Plant the top of the tower with a few plants to finish it off.

  • Step 10

    Water and fertilize as needed to ensure the plants are well-tended throughout the growing season. At the end of each blooming season, you can reuse the wire fence frame and remove the soil for future use. Always discard the landscape fabric after each use to ensure the next Flower Tower planting will thrive.

How-To

Brick Path

Create a walkway with a unique, random pattern using brick-style pavers.

Skill Level:
Advanced
Time:
One weekend
Cost:
$240
  • Tools & Materials

    • 200 4-inch x 8-inch pavers
      (4.5 pavers per square foot)
    • 20 bags sand paver base
    • 6 bags paver leveling sand
    • Measuring tape
    • Stakes
    • String
    • Shovel or tiller
    • Transplanting hand tool
    • Paver wet saw tool rental
    • Vibratory plate compactor tool rental
    • Tamper
    • Broom
    • Gloves
  • Step 1

    Determine your project area, paver size and type, and quantities required. For our purposes we will be creating a path 10 feet long and 3 feet wide using 4-inch x 8-inch pavers.

    Since we know the length and width of the path we’re creating, finding the square footage is a simple matter of multiplying the length (10 feet) by the width (3 feet), giving us a total area of 30 square feet. Since our path is curved, and pavers are cut irregularly, there is no exact science as to how many pavers you’ll need, but this gives you a general idea.

    Before laying the pavers, prepare the area by plotting out the path and clearing away any grass to a depth of around 4 to 6 inches. Using a measuring tape, stakes and string, mark out the course and finished elevation of the path. Then, using a shovel or tiller, begin clearing the area. A transplanting hand tool will help prepare the area along the edges of the path.

  • Step 2

    Use a shovel or tiller to fill in the path with paver base at a depth of about 4 inches, which means you’ll need about 20 bags of paver base. With the paver base in place, use a tamper to level out and settle the base. You may want to consider renting a powered tamper for larger areas.

  • Step 3

    After finishing off the paver base, apply a layer of leveling sand at a depth of about 1 inch. Just as before, tamp the leveling sand into place. You will need about six bags of leveling sand for your path.

  • Step 4

    Cut some of your pavers into smaller, angular pieces. These will give your Brick Path a unique visual appeal. Use a paver wet saw, which you can rent from your local Home Depot store.

  • Step 5

    Start placing pavers in the path. Use a combination of pavers you’ve cut and whole pavers. Place them randomly, at various angles, and aim for a more-or-less even distribution of sizes. Use these to cover an area of about 80 percent of your path.

    Consider doing this part in short sections, rather than laying all the stones at one time. This will help avoid unconsciously following a pattern.

  • Step 6

    Once you’re happy with the way your first paver stones are laid out, start filling in the gaps with more custom-cut pavers. You don’t have to cut these pavers so precisely that they fill each gap entirely. Just cut them in the approximate shape of each gap, so as not to leave any noticeably bare areas in the path.

  • Step 7

    Now that the pavers are in place, put a thin layer of paver sand on top of them. Run a vibratory plate compactor over the top of the pavers. This will set the pavers further in the ground, and ensure that they are all level with each other. Your Home Depot store can arrange a vibratory plate compactor rental for you.

    Use a broom to sweep any remaining sand into the cracks.

  • Step 8

    And now you have a gorgeous Brick Path you created yourself!

How-To

Paver Path

This walkway is easy to build and will enhance the look of your garden.

Skill Level:
Beginner
Time:
4-5 hours
Cost:
$380
  • Tools & Materials

    • 28 12-inch x 12-inch paver stones or step stones
    • 40 bags of paver base
    • 12 bags of paver leveling sand
    • Stakes
    • String
    • 10 bags of pea pebbles
    • Work Gloves
    • Tamper
    • Measuring tape
    • Shovel
    • Push Broom
  • Step 1

    The first step to creating your Paver Path is to determine your project area, paver size and type, and quantities required.

    For our purposes we will be creating a path 20 feet long and 3 feet wide using 12-inch x 12-inch paver stones. Since we know the length and width of the path we’re creating, finding the square footage is a simple matter of multiplying the length (20 feet) by the width (3 feet), giving us a total area of 60 square feet.

    The pavers will be laid out in pairs of two with 6 inches of space between each pair. There’s a gap of both 3 inches and 6 inches between pavers and walkway edge. The paver pairs will alternate spacing as the path continues. With this pattern, you’ll need a total of 28 pavers.

    Before laying the pavers, we need to prepare the area by plotting out the path and clearing away any grass to a depth of around 4 to 6 inches. Use stakes and string to mark out the course and finished elevation of the path.

    Then use a shovel or tiller to clear the area.

  • Step 2

    Fill in the path with paver base at a depth of about 4 inches, which means you’ll need about 40 bags of paver base.

    With the paver base in place, use a tamper to level out and settle the base. For larger areas, you may want to consider a powered tamper.

  • Step 3

    After finishing off the paver base, apply a layer of leveling sand at a depth of about 1 inch. You will need 12 bags of leveling sand for the path.

    Just as before, tamp the leveling sand into place.

  • Step 4

    Sketch the pattern for your stones, if possible. Using the measuring tape, begin laying out your paver stones, double-checking distances as you go along.

  • Step 5

    Now that all the pavers are in place, take any remaining sand and spread it across the pavers. Use a push broom to sweep it in between the pavers.

  • Step 6

    You can fill the space between the pavers with a material of your choice. Pea pebbles work great and can create some interesting contrast depending on the color of your pavers. Mulches help paths blend in with surrounding plant beds and vegetation. Using additional bags of sand between pavers is also an option, though it typically works best with pavers that have closer spacing.

  • Step 7

    Enjoy your beautiful new Paver Path!

How-To

Zipper Path

This eye-catching pathway is easy to build in just one weekend.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
One weekend
Cost:
$200
  • Tools & Materials

    • 20 12-inch x 12-inch paver stones
    • 20 bags of sand paver base
    • 6 bags paver leveling sand
    • 2 large bags of garden soil
    • Ground cover of your choice
    • Stakes
    • String
    • Rubber mallet
    • Shovel or tiller
    • Tamper
    • Measuring tape
    • Soil scoop
  • Step 1

    Determine your project area, paver size and type, and quantities required. For our purposes we will be creating a path 10 feet long and 4 feet wide using 12-inch x 12-inch paver stones.

    Since we know the length and width of the path we’re creating, finding the square footage is a simple matter of multiplying the length (10 feet) by the width (4 feet), giving us a total area of 40 square feet.

    The 12 x 12 pavers are going to be laid out in pairs of two with an empty space on one side. The empty space will alternate between the left side and the right side. With this pattern you’ll need a total of 20 pavers.

    Prepare the area by plotting out your path and clearing away any grass to a depth of around 4 to 6 inches. Use a combination of stakes — hammered in with a rubber mallet — and string to mark out the course and finished elevation of the path. Then, using a shovel or tiller, begin clearing the area.

  • Step 2

    Fill in the path with paver base at a depth of about 4 inches, which means you’ll need about 20 bags of paver base.

  • Step 3

    With the paver base in place, the next step will be to use a tamper to level out and settle the base into place. Depending on the size of the working area you are dealing with, you may also want to consider a powered tamper for larger areas.

  • Step 4

    After finishing off the paver base, apply a layer of leveling sand at a depth of about 1 inch. Just as before, tamp the leveling sand into place. You will need six bags of leveling sand for the walkway.

  • Step 5

    Using the measuring tape, begin laying out your paver stones, double checking distances as you go.

  • Step 6

    Use the soil scoop to fill in the alternating voids with garden soil. This will help your moss, ground cover or whatever you choose to plant get a strong root system established.

    Choose your ground cover based on your climate. A Home Depot Certified Nursery Consultant will be happy to help you decide. You might consider thyme, creeping phlox, dwarf periwinkle, moss, ajuga, or Dwarf Mondo, which we used.

  • Step 7

    Enjoy your new Zipper Path!

How-To

Stone Medallion Path

Add a beautiful stone accent to an outdoor walkway.

Skill Level:
Beginner
Time:
2-4 hours
Cost:
$55-$65 for each medallion
  • Tools & Materials

    • Landscape border project kit
    • Leveling sand
    • Polished pebbles
    • Miter saw
    • Hammer
    • Tamper
    • Hand trowel
    • Broom
    • Measuring tape
    • Work gloves
  • Step 1

    This project is intended to be inserted into a pre-existing walkway, and the steps are for one medallion. Clear a spot for the medallion form, and use the tamper to tamp down the soil, leaving a firm foundation. Create a square border that will contain your pattern by anchoring six 18-inch strips of the landscape border. Use the stakes included in the kit for anchors. Four of the strips will make the outer boundary of the square. The remaining strips will be used to form the rest of the pattern.

  • Step 2

    Next, form a cross in the square, creating four equal quadrants. Use a miter saw to cut four additional, shorter but equal length sections to form a diamond shape in the center. Secure all sections of border by hammering the stakes into firm soil.

  • Step 3

    Add leveling sand into the form, filling it up about halfway. Use a hand trowel to smooth the sand, leaving no gaps. The sand should be about 1 inch deep.

  • Step 4

    Separate the polished pebbles into individual colors, and then place them into the sections, creating a pattern. Consider the colors and sizes of the pebbles when you create your mosaic pattern.

  • Step 5

    Tamp the stones to seat them firmly into the sand and sweep the project with a wide, soft broom to settle the sand and polish the finished product.

  • Step 6

    Stand back and admire your lovely Stone Medallion Path.

How-To

Chalkpaint Wall Pattern

Use chalk patterns to decorate your wall. It’s more striking than wallpaper, and you can change it whenever you’d like.

Skill Level:
Beginner
Time:
2-3 hours, not including drying time
Cost:
$40-$50
  • Tools & Materials

    • 1 quart Rust-Oleum Tintable Chalkboard Paint in Banner Blue
    • Primer
    • Roller tray set
    • Plastic drop cloth
    • Painter’s tape
    • Chalk ink marker
    • Hobby knife
    • Self-healing cutting mat
    • Poster board
  • Step 1

    Use your painter’s tape to mask off baseboards and moulding on the wall that you will be painting. Also, lay a drop cloth to protect your floors.

  • Step 2

    Prime the walls with primer. Allow it to dry for two to three hours before painting.

  • Step 3

    Once the primer has dried, it’s time to paint with the chalkboard paint. Two coats of chalkboard paint are recommended. Allow four hours for the first coat to dry before applying the second coat.

    Before you can write on your chalkboard paint with chalk, allow it to cure for three days. Then remove the painter’s tape.

  • Step 4

    For your stencil, you can make one, or use the one we have included in the PDF. Print off your pattern on heavy paper and cut it out with a hobby knife. We suggest using poster board and printing out an 8.5-inch x 11-inch stencil. Attach your stencil to poster board with painter’s tape, and cut out the stencil with your hobby knife.

  • Step 5

    Attach your stencil to the wall with painter’s tape and fill in the pattern with chalk ink markers.

  • Step 6

    Step back and admire your unique Chalkpaint Wall Pattern.

How-To

Lattice Wall Pattern

Create a dynamic pattern that’s perfect for an accent wall.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
2-5 hours, not including drying time
Cost:
$100-$115
  • Tools & Materials

    • 1 gallon Behr Premium Plus Home Song paint (line color)
    • 1 gallon Home Decorators Collection Zesty Apple paint
    • 4 pack 1.5-inch painter’s tape
    • Measuring tape
    • Pencil
    • Scissors
    • Paint roller set
    • Drop cloth
  • Step 1

    Mask off any crown moulding or baseboards on the wall that you are painting. Lay down a drop cloth on or around any area you wish to keep protected.

  • Step 2

    Paint the wall the color you want the intersecting line pattern to be. We used Behr Premium Plus Home Song in an eggshell finish. Allow the paint to dry for 24 hours.

    Note: It is important to wait 24 hours so that the paint has time to cure before you put painter’s tape on it.

  • Step 3

    With the measuring tape, make marks for the “diamonds” in the lattice pattern across the whole width of your wall. Keep in mind that the smaller the diamond width, the smaller the pattern; the larger the diamond width, the larger the pattern.

    Start by deciding how wide you want the diamonds to be across the bottom of the wall. Make sure that the number you choose can be evenly divided across the width of your wall with no leftover inches.

    For example, let’s say you have a wall that is 8 feet tall by 12 feet wide, and you want 12-inch diamonds. This will work because if you calculate your width of 12 feet by converting the feet into inches (144 inches) and divide that by 12 inches, you will have 12, 12-inch diamonds.

    You can also start by deciding how many diamonds you want across the bottom of the wall, again making sure that the number can be evenly divided across the entire width, leaving no leftover inches.

    For example, let’s say that on that same 8 by 12 wall, you want 18 diamonds. Convert your width of 12 feet into inches (144 inches) and divide it by 18. That calculation — 144 divided by 18 — equals eight. So each diamond will be 8 inches wide.

    Now that these decisions are made, make a mark at whichever width you have chosen for your diamonds, across the top and bottom widths of your wall only.

  • Step 4

    Find the middle of the width of your wall. Now you will begin to tape off your intersecting lines of the pattern. When taping, make sure that your pencil mark falls in the middle of the width of the tape.

    If a pencil mark falls on your middle width measurement, connect this mark to the top left corner of your wall. Continue with the mark to the right of the middle mark on the bottom, connecting this mark to the mark next to the top left corner. Continue with these diagonals until you have connected the bottom right corner with its corresponding top mark.

    If the middle of the wall is in between two pencil marks, connect the first mark to the left of the middle to the top left corner. Continue with the next mark to the right on the bottom, connecting it to the first mark to the right of the top left corner. Keep doing this until you have connected the lower right corner with its corresponding top mark.

  • Step 5

    Now it’s time to complete the diamond shape by marking off another set of diagonals.

    If a pencil mark falls on your middle measurement, start with your middle mark and connect it to the top right corner. Continue with the mark to the left of the middle mark on the bottom, and connect it to the mark left of the top right corner. Continue with these diagonals until you have connected the bottom left corner with its corresponding top mark.

    If the middle of the wall is in between two pencil marks, connect the first mark to the right of the middle to the top right corner. Continue with the next mark to the left on the bottom, connecting it to the first mark to the left of the top right corner. Keep doing this until you have connected the lower left corner with its corresponding top mark.

  • Step 6

    Measure the height of a single diamond. Make sure you pick a column of diamonds that shows the full height. Since the tape is centered on the pencil marks that you’ve made, take the height measurement from the middle of the intersection of tape.

  • Step 7

    Starting with the top left and right corners and using the height measurement of the diamond, repeat the height down the entire height of the wall (on both sides). You will make a mark after each diamond height has been measured.

  • Step 8

    Now you have the marks to finish your pattern. Connect by taping any remaining top and bottom marks to the new side marks.

  • Step 9

    Once you have taped off the lattice pattern, paint the wall with your desired color. We used Home Decorators Collection Zesty Apple in an eggshell finish.

  • Step 10

    Wait about an hour, and carefully remove the painter’s tape. Pull off the tape at a 45-degree angle so as not to compromise your edges. Touch up if needed.

  • Step 11

    Time to enjoy your new Lattice Wall Pattern!

How-To

Metallic Painted Ceiling

This ceiling treatment adds drama and elegance to any room, and it’s so easy to do.

Skill Level:
Beginner
Time:
8-10 hours, including prep and drying time
Cost:
$150
  • Tools & Materials

    • 1 gallon Martha Stewart Living Precious Metals Kiwi Peel paint
    • Primer
    • 4 8-foot pieces of 11/16 x 2 ¼-inch moulding
    • Saw and miter box
    • Construction adhesive
    • 2-inch painter’s tape
    • Drop cloth
    • Ladder
    • Pencil
    • Measuring tape
    • Paint roller set
  • Step 1

    Using the painter’s tape, mask off a 6-foot x 6-foot area on your ceiling, and cover the ceiling light fixture. Make sure your ladder is on steady ground and do not over-reach.

  • Step 2

    Cover your furniture and carpet with a drop cloth.

  • Step 3

    Prime the area with the primer. After you are done priming, clean the roller thoroughly, and wait at least two hours before you begin painting.

  • Step 4

    Paint the square with the metallic paint using a roller. Wait four hours, and apply a second coat.

  • Step 5

    Once the second coat has been applied, remove the painter’s tape at a 45-degree angle. Touch up around the edges if necessary.

  • Step 6

    Measure each side of the ceiling area you painted, and mark that measurement on each piece of moulding. Make sure to leave equal excess on each end to accommodate the angle. Using the marks as a guide, cut each end at a 45-degree angle. In order for the pieces to fit together properly, cut each end in opposing directions like this: \ / .

  • Step 7

    Using the construction adhesive, glue the moulding, in a square, to the ceiling.

  • Step 8

    Now, admire your work!

How-To

Painted Rug

This painted rug will be a striking addition to the floor of any room.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
24-48 hours, including taping, measuring and drying time
Cost:
$120
  • Tools & Materials

    • 1 gallon Behr #434 Oil-Based Primer
    • 1 gallon Behr Porch & Floor Paint Low Luster Ultra-Pure White, tinted to Home Decorators Collection Crème De Caramel
    • 1 gallon Behr Ultra Sandstone Cove
    • Roller tray set
    • Polypropylene paint tray liner
    • 2-inch painter’s tape
    • Yardstick
    • Measuring tape
    • Disposable Gloves
    • Painter's pole
    • Pencil
  • Step 1

    Make sure your floor is clean. Then mark the outside dimensions of your 5-foot x 7-foot rug with a pencil and tape just outside the lines. Leave the pencil marks exposed so they will be painted over.

  • Step 2

    Prime your floor with Behr #434 Oil-Based Primer. Use a 9-inch roller attached to a painter’s pole to cover the interior of your taped rectangle. Apply two coats, and wait about two hours between coats.

  • Step 3

    After you have allowed the primer to dry completely, apply your first coat of Behr Porch & Floor Paint (Crème De Caramel); wait four hours and apply your second coat. Allow this base color to dry for about six hours.

  • Step 4

    Now begin drawing the lines of the stripes. Starting at one end of your rectangle going lengthwise, use a measuring tape to mark off every 6 inches to the opposite end. Do this on both sides of the rectangle, and then connect the two marks by drawing a straight line with a yardstick. Tape off every alternating stripe, leaving the pencil marks exposed inside the area to be painted.

  • Step 5

    Now you can begin painting your stripes using the Behr Ultra Sandstone Cove. After your first coat, wait four hours, then apply your second coat.

  • Step 6

    Allow the second coat to dry about two hours, and remove the tape. Pull the tape off at a 45-degree angle; this will help the tape break free from the painted edge without pulling up the fresh paint. Allow 24 hours cure time before putting your new rug to use.

  • Step 7

    The result: a beautiful Painted Rug as a focal point for your room!

How-To

Hanging Bed

This Hanging Bed is perfect for a back porch or summer home.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
8 hours
Cost:
$350
  • Tools & Materials

    • 4 3/8-inch x 6-inch eye bolts
    • 8-foot long 4 x 4 posts
    • 8 double shear hangers
    • 4-pack 3/8-inch fender washers
    • 4 8-foot long 2 x 4 posts
    • 4 corner brackets
    • 4 joist hangers
    • 1 box 10d joist hanger nails
    • 2 9 oz. tubes adhesive
    • 4 x 8 x ¼-inch sanded pine plywood
    • 3 8-foot long 1 x 6 pine posts
    • 1 pack 1 ½-inch finishing nails
    • 1 pack 1 ½-inch common nails
    • Tack cloths
    • 1 quart Behr Exterior Latex Primer
    • 1 quart Behr Exterior Gloss White Paint
    • 4 3/8 x 5-inch eye bolts
    • 8 pack 3/8-inch bolt washers
    • 4 2-pack 2-inch S-hooks
    • 2 15-foot packs #135 chain
    • 75 x 38-inch bunk bed mattress
    • 6-foot step ladder
    • Measuring tape
    • Carpenter’s pencil
    • 3/8-inch VSR drill
    • 3/8-inch drill bit
    • Screwdriver
    • 15-inch hand saw
    • Caulk gun
    • Claw Hamme
    • Chalk line
    • 9/16-inch combination wrench
    • 2/32-inch nail setter
    • Paint brush tray kit
    • Framing square
    • Work gloves
    • Safety glasses

    This project is intended for open joist or open rafter ceilings. Access to these structural members is needed to construct braces suitable for supporting the weight of a bed and its occupants. Finished ceilings will need to be opened up and later repaired.

    The bed uses a standard twin size bunk bed mattress, which is 75 inches x 38 inches. You will be constructing a supporting frame of this size using 2-inch x 4-inch lumber, and wrapping the frame sides with 1-inch x 6-inch pine boards, which will keep the mattress in place. Because this bed hangs, it can swing somewhat, so avoid placing it near walls or other furniture.

    Disclaimer: Local law in your geographic area may contain specific codes or ordinances that may affect or place restrictions on your project. You are advised to consult with your local authorities before initiating this project.

  • Step 1

    Measure the joist spacing where the bed will hang — either 14 ½ inches or 16 inches on center joists, or 22 ½ inches or 24 inches on center joists. Cut four pieces of 4 x 4 post lumber to that length.

    Using the double shear hangers and joist hanger nails, secure the 4 x 4 braces you have cut to the ceiling joists. Each pair of braces should be spaced 75 inches apart so that you are able to drill vertical holes in each brace with a spacing between 28 inches and 34 inches. If you have open rafters, you can mount these braces higher up into the space for an improved appearance. If you plan on refinishing the ceiling, these mounts will need to be flush with the bottom of the joists.

  • Step 2

    Using a 3/8-inch drill bit, drill one vertical hole in each 4 x 4 brace. This is where the hanging eye bolts will go. These holes should be centered in the width of the brace, but can be drilled anywhere along its length so that the eye bolts will be located in a rectangle sized about 76 inches x 30 inches. As noted above, the width can vary as needed more than the length.

  • Step 3

    Push each 3/8 x 6-inch eye bolt through its hole. Place a 3/8-inch fender washer on the threaded end, and then thread on its nut. Tighten the nut with a 9/16-inch wrench, using a screwdriver placed through the eye to keep it from turning. The eyes should be parallel with the length of the bed frame location.

  • Step 4

    To begin frame construction, cut your 2 x 4 lumber into two 75-inch pieces and four 35-inch pieces. Two of the 35-inch boards will be on the ends of the bed, while the other two will be inside support members.

    Using joist hanger nails, attach the four corner brackets to the two 35-inch end pieces. These are located on the inside of each board at each end, placed flush with the very end of each board.

  • Step 5

    Using joist hanger nails, attach the four joist hangers to the 75-inch boards. These are located on the inside of each board 25 inches away from each end, forming the mounts for the inside frame support boards.

  • Step 6

    Apply adhesive to the end of one of the 35-inch support boards, place it in the hanger, and nail it in. Repeat this with the second support board.

    Apply adhesive to the other ends of these support boards, and place them into the hangers on the opposite 75-inch rail. Nail these in.

  • Step 7

    Apply a bead of adhesive to both ends of one 35-inch end support, and set it in place at one end of the frame. You can now nail in the corner braces to the long frame rails. Repeat with the second end.

  • Step 8

    Cut the ¼-inch plywood down to mattress size: 75 inches x 38 inches. Mark the plywood 25 inches from each long end, and use the chalk line to make two lines. These will correspond to the inside support board locations.

  • Step 9

    Apply a bead of adhesive along the top of the 2 x 4 subframe, including the end and support boards.

  • Step 10

    Place the plywood on top of the frame, and use the 1 1/2-inch common nails to secure it to the boards. Space the nails about a foot apart and include three nails for each inside support along the chalk lines you drew.

    You now have a finished supporting subframe, which should be the same size as your mattress.

  • Step 11

    Cut your pine 1 x 6 boards into two 75-inch pieces and two 39 ½-inch pieces. These will provide a finished look to your bed, as well as hold the mattress in place.

  • Step 12

    Apply a bead of adhesive to one long side of your subframe, and attach a 75-inch pine board to it using six to eight finishing nails. Use your nail set to punch the finishing nails flush with the pine board. Repeat this process with the other side, and then with each end.

  • Step 13

    Measure and mark hole locations for the bed eye bolts. There are two of these on each end of the bed, 5 inches in from the corner and 1 inch up from the bottom edge.

    Using your 3/8-inch bit, drill these four holes through the pine boards and the 2 x 4 frame boards.

  • Step 14

    Use your tack cloth to remove dirt and dust residue from the sides and plywood top to prepare for painting.

    Prime the bed frame and plywood with Behr Exterior Latex Primer. This primer needs a minimum of one hour drying time before painting over it. If you have the time, four hours is better.

    Paint the bed frame and plywood with Behr Exterior Gloss Paint. We chose white, but you can have any color you desire mixed for you. Allow at least one hour drying time.

  • Step 15

    Attach the bed frame eye bolts through the holes you drilled before painting. Use the regular 3/8-inch washers and the supplied nuts, and tighten the same way you attached the ceiling eyes. The eye bolts should be oriented vertically.

  • Step 16

    Use the S-hooks to attach each eye bolt on the bed to the end of each chain. One at a time, lift the bed and hook the chain to a ceiling support. The bed height you choose is a matter of personal preference, but keep in mind who will be using the bed. It should be hung level regardless of height.

    Surplus chain links should be at the ceiling end rather than hanging off the bed. The chain lengths were chosen for ceiling heights between 8 and 9 feet. If you have a higher or sloped ceiling, you may have to adjust the chain lengths that you purchase. This chain can be purchased in any length you desire at Home Depot stores.

  • Step 17

    Place the mattress inside the frame.

  • Step 18

    And now you have a Hanging Bed you made yourself. Congratulations!

How-To

Outdoor Serving Cart

This DIY serving cart is not only functional, but it’s stylish, too.

Skill Level:
Advanced
Time:
One weekend
Cost:
$150-$170
  • Tools & Materials

    • 4 2-inch x 4-inch x 10-foot studs, with the following cuts:
      • 4 36-inch for the front and back frame
      • 4 15-inch for the side frame
      • 6 32-inch for the legs
    • 1 4-foot x 8-foot cabinet grade plywood, with the following cuts:
      • 1 36-inch x 18-inch for the cart top
      • 1 21 inch x 15-inch for the lower shelf
      • 3 12-inch x 15-inch for the small shelves
    • 12 feet of 1-inch x 2-inch poplar board, with the following cuts:
      • 6 12-inch for shelf supports
      • 2 5-inch for shelf supports
      • 2 17 ½-inch for shelf supports
    • 29 feet of 2-inch lattice, with the following cuts:
      • 4 36 ½-inch for trim
      • 4 18-inch for trim
      • 4 15-inch for trim
      • 4 12 ½-inch for trim
    • 12 3/8-inch x 4-inch carriage bolts
    • 2 3/8-inch flat washers
    • 12 3/8-inch nuts
    • 1 box 3-inch wood screws
    • 1 box 1 ½-inch wood screws
    • 2 2 ½-inch rigid casters
    • 1 2 ½-inch swivel caster
    • 1 2 ½-inch swivel caster with brake
    • 2 Levelor 1-inch Replacement Universal Brackets
    • 18 inches 1-inch diameter wooden dowel
    • Square
    • Measuring tape
    • Table or circular saw
    • Drill
    • 3/8-inch spade bit
    • Router with straight bit
    • Hammer
    • Jigsaw
    • Wood glue
    • Hole saw
    • Pencil or marker
    • Work gloves
    • Safety glasses
  • Step 1

    Build the frame.

    Take two of the 36-inch front/back frame pieces and two of the 15-inch side frame pieces, and measure down along the face of each ¾ of an inch, and draw a line. This line should connect along the top from one piece to another on the inside of the frame.

    Screw the pieces together using the 3-inch screws. Make sure that the 15-inch sides are secured between the 36-inch front/back pieces, giving you a total depth of 18 inches and a length of 36 inches. This frame section will make up the bottom frame of the cart.

  • Step 2

    With the 32-inch frame legs, measure down from the top and up from the bottom 3 ½ inches, and draw a line straight across. You should now have a 3 ½ x 3 ½-inch square at the top and bottom of each leg.

  • Step 3

    In the top section of a frame leg, measure along the line you created at 1 ¾ inches. Mark it, and use a square to draw a line to the top of the board. Measure up this line 1 ½ inches, and mark the spot.

  • Step 4

    At the bottom of the legs, measure across the drawn line at 1 ¾ inches. Mark it, and use a square to draw a line to the board bottom. Measure down this line 2 inches and mark with a pencil or marker. These marks will be where you will eventually drill for the carriage bolts that will hold the top and bottom frame to the frame legs.

  • Step 5

    Use four of the legs to help make the shelf section. Taking one leg, measure up from the bottom of the leg 12 ½ inches and mark it. Using the square, draw a line straight across. Measure up another 10 inches, and mark it with a line. Repeat for the other three legs.

  • Step 6

    Use a 3/8-inch spade bit to drill all the marked carriage bolt holes in the frame legs.

  • Step 7

    Take the top and bottom frames, and working one side at a time, align each leg into its proper corner.

    Note: Make sure the legs marked for the shelf section are facing each other on the same side. Only two are used at this point. Secure them with a clamp. The legs should be flush with the upper edge of the top frame and the lower edge of the bottom frame.

  • Step 8

    When you are happy with the alignment, working one corner at a time, remove the clamp and use the existing hole in the leg as a guide to drill the hole through the frame. Place a 3/8-inch bolt through the frame, adding a washer and nut.

  • Step 9

    With the cart in front of you, measure from the outer edge of the shelf section 12 inches along the top and bottom frame and mark. Using the marks you just made, align the outer edge of one of the remaining two shelf-section legs and clamp and drill as you did when securing the other legs in Step 7. Repeat for opposite side.

  • Step 10

    Starting with the bottom frame and using the ¾-inch border you made in Step 1 as a guide, mount the shelf supports using 1 ½-inch wood screws. The 12-inch supports mount along the cart sides, the 5-inch supports mount between the shelf section legs, and mount the 17 ½-inch support along the remaining length.

    Note: Pre-drill holes on these pieces so the wood doesn’t split.

  • Step 11

    The last four 12-inch shelf supports mount at the guide marks we made for the shelf support section in Step 5.

  • Step 12

    Build the top and shelves.

    To help make the serving cart more functional, we embedded a cutting board and created a few herb jar holders. The area you will need to route out will depend entirely on the size of the cutting board you select. We used a 13 x 9 ½ x ¾-inch cutting board.

    Start by creating a border for the cutting board of the 36- inch x 18-inch plywood top. Measure and mark a 2-inch border along the short and long side. Place the cutting board against this border, and trace the shape of the cutting board onto the plywood.

    With the outline in place, select a straight bit, set the router depth to ½ inch, and clear out the area inside of the outline. Get as close as you can to the outline without going over. Use a 'guide' for the router, like a scrap piece of 2 x 4, for the straight edge.

  • Step 13

    Starting on the same side as the cutting board, measure across 28 ½ inches and use the square to draw a line across the cart’s top. Place marks along the line at 4 ½ inches, 9 inches, and 13 ½ inches. These marks indicate the center of the holes for the herb jars. Drill the holes through the plywood using a 3 ¼-inch hole saw.

    Place the top aside for now.

  • Step 14

    The bottom shelves require some edits before putting them in place. The shelves will need to be notched to fit around the legs of the cart.

    Starting with 21 x 15-inch shelf, measure and mark in 3 ½ inches, and use a square to place a line parallel with the 15-inch side of the shelf. Measure in from each edge 1 ½ inches, and use the square to lay a line from the board edge to the line we drew just before. Use a jigsaw to cut out the resulting corners.

  • Step 15

    The corners of the 12 x 15 shelves need to be similarly notched. Working from the 12-inch sides, measure in from each corner 3 ½ inches, and into the board by 1 ½ inches. Remove the resulting corner with the jigsaw.

    Repeat for the other two 12 x 15 shelves.

    Note: The general shape of the shelf matches the inside contours of the lower frame. If you are not sure of something, always check against this.

  • Step 16

    Finish the cart.

    While the cabinet grade plywood has an excellent-looking surface, the edges are rough and need to be covered.

    Place the shelves working from the bottom up.

    Attach the cart’s top to the frame using the 1 ½-inch screws, one at each corner and one along the length of the plywood on each side.

  • Step 17

    To hide the edge of the cart top, use the 2-inch lattice. The lattice will be flush with the top of the plywood, hiding the plywood edge as well as the seam where it meets the frame. The longer 36 ½-inch trim will need to overlap the cart corners by ¼ inch on each side, with the shorter 15-inch trim sandwiched in between.

    Repeat this process for the bottom of the cart, as well as the two shelves held within the legs.

    Secure all trim to the cart using wood glue and/or finishing nails.

  • Step 18

    Attach the casters at the corners. The two rigid casters need to be placed on the end opposite the leg shelves. This placement will give you more control when pushing the cart and help prevent tipping.

    With the cart now on its wheels, you can place decorative hooks to hold any utensils you want to have on hand. Place the hooks along the frame just below the trim to keep them within easy reach.

  • Step 19

    The last thing we need to add is a handle to push the serving cart.

    To construct the handle for this serving cart, we decided to repurpose some curtain brackets and a wooden dowel. The brackets are mounted 1 inch in from the cart edge on the side opposite the rigid wheels. The dowel is 18 inches long, so it fits flush with the width of the cart. Lock the dowel into place using the Replacement Universal Brackets.

  • Step 20

    Since this serving cart will primarily be used outside, you have several options for staining or painting. Or you can choose to keep a more natural look.

    Congratulations on building your Outdoor Serving Cart!

How-To

Outdoor Privacy Wall

This stylish divider provides a little privacy on your platform deck while letting the breeze through.

Skill Level:
Intermediate
Time:
1-2 hours for one 5 x 8 section, not including time for stain to dry
Cost:
$400
  • Tools & Materials

    • 2 cedar 4-inch x 4-inch x 8-inch posts
    • 56 Cedar 2-inch x 2-inch x 8-inch slats
    • 2 pounds #12 2 ½-inch galvanized orstainless steel finishing nails
    • 2-inch stain grade brush
    • 1 gallon Behr exterior transparentstain
    • 2 ½-inch wood screws
    • 2 Simpson Strong-Tie E-Z Basebrackets
    • 3/8-inch x 3-inch galvanizedlag screws
    • Level
    • Hammer
    • Measuring tape
    • Reciprocating or hand saw
    • Impact driver

    Before you start, cut the 4 x 4 posts to be 5 feet long with either a reciprocating saw or hand saw. You can also have these posts cut for you at your local Home Depot store.

  • Step 1

    Stain all sides of the wood pieces before starting construction. Let them dry according to the stain manufacturer’s instructions.

  • Step 2

    Lay the two 4 x 4 posts on the floor of your work area, and use a measuring tape to place them 8 feet apart, measuring from outer edge to outer edge.

  • Step 3

    Place the E-Z Base brackets on each post. Make sure the post is inserted all the way into the bracket. Do not mount the posts with screws at this point. This will be the bottom of your wall. Use a level and these brackets as a guide to set your first 2 x 2 slat. Attach it with finishing nails. Once the first slat is attached, you can remove the brackets so your wall is lying flat.

  • Step 4

    Starting from the bottom, nail the 2 x 2 slats horizontally onto the posts. Maintain equal spacing between the slats by using a piece of the same 2 x 2 material as a spacer during installation. Repeat the same process on the other side of the wall.

  • Step 5

    Return the brackets to the bottom of the wall, with the mounting edges on the front and back of the wall. Mount the brackets to the 4 x 4 posts using the wood screws and impact driver.

  • Step 6

    Use the lag screws and impact driver to mount the brackets to your deck. The brackets should be mounted to the deck flooring and decking frame.

  • Step 7

    And now you have a stylish privacy wall for your deck.

How-To

Functional Vertical Garden

This charming vertical garden is so easy to make, and it will make your patio look beautiful.

Skill Level:
Beginner
Time:
About 45 minutes to repot your plants; 5 minutes to hang the pots on the trellis
Cost:
$65, not including plants of your choice
  • Tools & Materials

    • 24-inch x 72-inch trellis
    • 8 8-inch resin terra cotta pots
    • 16 S-hooks
    • 32 quart bag of potting soil
    • Plants of your choice
  • Step 1

    Lean the trellis against a wall at about a 10- to 15-degree angle.

  • Step 2

    Add potting soil to the pots, filling them each about halfway.

  • Step 3

    Transfer your plants to the pots, and fill the edges with additional potting soil. Leave about half an inch of space from the top. Water the plants thoroughly.

  • Step 4

    Set two S-hooks onto the trellis for each planter as shown. Place each pot onto the S-hooks, with two of the hooks holding each of the pots.

  • Step 5

    Enjoy your new Functional Vertical Garden!

How-To

Tile Shower Nook

This nook is a great way to update your shower and create extra storage space.

Skill Level:
Advanced
Time:
24-48 hours, including drying time for tile mortar or grout
Cost:
$220-$240
  • Tools & Materials

    • Stud finder
    • Measuring tape
    • Level
    • Dust mask
    • Hammer
    • Saw (either hand or powered)
    • 1 8-foot length of 2 x 4
    • 2 3 x 5 x ¼-inch pieces of backerboard
    • Backerboard seam tape
    • 1 box #8 x 1 1/4 backerboard screws
    • 1 gallon RedGard Waterproofing Membrane
    • Paint brush
    • Splashback 12-inch x 12-inch Basket Braid Dark Emperador Mosaic Tile
    • MS International Crema Marfil 2-inch x 12-inch rail moulding
    • China marker
    • Tile installation kit
    • Bucket
    • Grouting gloves
    • 1 quart Bright White Pre-Mixed Tile Adhesive and Grout
    • 1 quart Alabaster Pre-Mixed Tile Adhesive and Grout
    • Grouting sponge
    • Grout and tile sealer
    • 4-inch tile saw
    • Safety glasses
    • Utility knife
    • 2-inch putty knife
  • Step 1

    To determine where the shower nook will go, first use the stud finder to locate the studs in the wall. You can do this by using the stud finder directly over the tiles in the shower, or from the other side of the wall.

    Be aware if any wiring, pipes, or insulation are behind the walls; this will be important in the following steps. If you are aware of any intrusions in the wall, you can move or alter your shower nook.

  • Step 2

    After finding the studs, mark the area where the tiles need to be cut with the china marker. The marker will not stain or discolor tile, so you can make as many marks as you wish.

    Studs usually don’t meet at the grout lines, so you’ll be mostly cutting directly into tile. Carefully lay out an area between the studs. Ours will also have a stud in the center. We worked with a space that was 32 ½ inches wide and 42 inches tall, approximately 3 ½ to 4 feet from the floor of the shower.

    After marking the area, recheck your measurements using the level.

    Many homes are not exactly square and level, so getting the square as close as possible is fine in many cases.

    That 32 ½ x 42-inch rectangle will be the size of your shower nook. Since most homes are built with studs with 16 inches on center between them, this should give you a secure installation.

    Also, the specific location you want your new shower nook may require studs to be removed. This can be done, and the studs cut out can be used to frame the top and bottom of the nook. These supports are also called cross-members.

  • Step 3

    Use the tile saw, and proceed to cut into the tiles and grout where marked. Wear the dust mask as you do this. Work slowly so as not to cut too much existing tile off and to cut the straightest line possible.

    You can also cut the tiles and grout within the rectangle to help remove the existing tile. Cut only as deep as the tile, so you are removing the “layers” of tile and backerboard in sections, not all once. This is for safety, in case there are any unforeseen intrusions in the wall.

    Any stubborn or hard-to-remove tiles can be pried off or broken off using the hammer.

  • Step 4

    After removing all layers of tile, mortar and backerboard, you should have an exposed 32 ½ x 42-inch hole in the tiled wall. Inspect the just-cut edges to ensure the tile is straight, and verify there are no intrusions such as electrical wiring or pipes along the entire depth of the area you just removed.

  • Step 5

    Use the measuring tape to measure the depth of the studs from the back all the way to the front wall. Most homes should have 4 inches, but others may be 6 inches deep.

    The nook will be 4 inches deep since most shampoo and soap bottles can fit easily at this size on the shelf.

  • Step 6

    Measure 32 ½ inches (or at the closest measurement if the space between your studs is different) on the 8-foot 2 x 4. This will become your top and bottom cross-member frames for the nook.

  • Step 7

    Cut the 2 x 4 at the 32 ½-inch measurement, and then carefully place them at the top and bottom openings. Leave about 3/4 inch visible, but flush with the cut tile. Fasten both top and bottom cross-members into the existing side studs using the backerboard screws.

    For the bottom cross-member, you’ll need to install it at a slight downward angle to ensure any water runs off and away from the nook. Use your level to ensure this is done correctly. Too much of a pitched angle will let your shampoo bottles slide off, so this step is very important!

  • Step 8

    Measure the inside of your framed-in shower nook on all four sides, plus the new back wall made up of two pieces, above and below the shelf. Use your utility knife to cut the ¼-inch backerboard into 10 pieces to cover the wood frames.

    The backerboard only needs to be deeply scored, then it can be snapped off to the size needed to cover up the wood.

    Use backerboard screws to fasten each piece directly into the studs and cross-members.

  • Step 9

    Use backerboard seam tape along all edges of the backerboard. Wearing grouting gloves, apply the Bright White adhesive with the putty knife. Place a liberal amount over the seam tape edges, using the squeegee from your tile installation kit.

    Remove any excessive amounts of adhesive so the new tiles in the nook can rest on top of the backerboard in a level and secure manner. Allow the adhesive to dry six to eight hours.

  • Step 10

    After inspecting the backerboard seams and ensuring they are dry, apply the RedGard Waterproofing Membrane on the backerboard and seam surfaces using the paint brush.

    Let the first coat set for one hour, then repaint a second coat to ensure you are making a 100 percent waterproof surface for your new tiles.

  • Step 11

    After the RedGard dries, you can begin to lay out your tiles for placement. Using the 12 x 12 mosaic tile, match up your pattern to fill the space. You may have to cut some tiles to fit.

  • Step 12

    After laying out and measuring the tiles, start on the back wall. Wear your gloves as you secure the tiles onto the backerboard surface using the Bright White adhesive, and grout with the small notched trowel from your tile installation kit.

    If cutting is necessary, it can be done effectively using your tile saw. Make sure to wear your dust mask. Use the level as a straight edge and mark with the china marker to get a perfect cut.

    For the side walls of the nook, continue piecing individual tiles into the ongoing pattern until you reach the edge. You will once again need to cut tile excess as needed.

  • Step 12 (Continued)

    Use the 2 x 12 rail moulding to frame the nook. You’ll have to cut the rail moulding to accommodate the 90-degree corners of the nook, as well as placement of the joints.

    After installing the remaining tiles, let them set six to eight hours or overnight to ensure it has bonded properly.

  • Step 13

    After the adhesive has dried underneath the tiles, you are now ready to grout. Using the Alabaster adhesive and grout, take the squeegee from your tile installation kit and force the grout into the grout lines on all the new tiles.

    Wipe off all excessive grout and haze immediately using your grouting sponge. Let the grout dry out for four to six hours.

  • Step 13 (Continued)

    After the grout has dried, you can use your tile and grout sealer to further protect your nook. Spray a generous amount on all surfaces of the shower nook and then use your clean grouting sponge to spread the sealer evenly over the surface. After the sealer is dry, you can apply a second coat for further protection.

  • Step 14

    And there you have it, a custom-built Tile Shower Nook!